Category Archives: Ellesmere’s History

Ellesmere Shropshire Railway Station

Ellesmere Shropshire Railway Station

Ellesmere Railway station in the 1950’s and 60’s a popular railway stop situated between Wrexham and Whitchurch.

The railway station’s access was from Brownlow Road and was closed in 1965.

In 1923 the Cambrian Railway was taken over by the Great Western Railway. In GWR days seven trains operated daily in each direction between Oswestry and Whitchurch. Eight operated on the line to Wrexham Central.

During the Second World War many extra trains ran through Ellesmere as there were large military depots and camps situated locally. At Overton, on the Wrexham Branch, there was a large military hospital which also generated traffic.

On the 1st January 1948, Ellesmere Station, and the lines that served it, became part of the Nationalised British Railways Western Region by the late 1950s competition from road transport was having a massive effect. Services had been reduced and on the 8th September 1962 the Wrexham Central service ended and the line was lifted from Ellesmere to Pickhill.

This left Ellesmere with only services on the Whitchurch to Welshpool axis. This service continued until the 18th January 1965 when the station was closed to passengers.

Goods services continued to run from Ellesmere to Whitchurch until the 29th March 1965. Ellesmere Station’s main building is still there today and for many years was used as office accommodation.

ellesmere railway station platform

Ellesmere railway station platform

ellesmere railway goods yard

Ellesmere railway goods yard

ellesmere railway station

Ellesmere railway station

Ellesmere Shropshire Railway Station

Ellesmere Shropshire Railway Station

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Ellesmere Dairy

Ellesmere Dairy

Ellesmere dairy Shropshire

Ellesmere dairy Shropshire

I was part of the last team to work at Ellesmere dairy just before it finally closed,  it was used for cheese packing and then finally cheese storage before closing for good, I am sure there are many Ellesmere people who have fond memories of the dairy as it had a large local workforce.

 

Ellesmere Dairy was built in the 1930s to serve the many dairy farms in the region. The creamery was owned by United Dairies, which became Unigate Dairies in 1959. At some point before its closure in 1987-89 the ownership of the creamery transferred to Dairy Crest. When closed it employed nearly 300 people – probably a good third of the town’s workforce – so it was a major blow to the town. The site occupied about 50 acres, of which perhaps 15-20 acres were covered by buildings. Much of the equipment was removed from the creamery when it closed.

As the dairy became more derelict it became a danger and was open to abuse from vandalism, what was once a main workplace for many Ellesmere workers, became an eyesore  which needed urgent attention, not only for the safety of children in the area but for the look and appeal of Ellesmere to visitors and local residents.

Ellesmere Shropshire dairy

Ellesmere dairy

Now The old Ellesmere Shropshire Dairy is gone giving way to new development on the Wharf like Tesco’s and housing developments.

tesco ellesmere shropshire

Tesco supermarket Ellesmere Shropshire

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Ellesmere Castle

Ellesmere Castle

Ellesmere Castle Shropshire

Ellesmere Castle

Ellesmere Shropshire motte and bailey castle 200m south west of St Mary’s Church is a well- preserved example of this class of monument, despite later modification to the top of the motte and the southern side of the bailey. Extensive remains of the structures that stood on the motte and within the bailey are expected to survive as buried features, which together with the associated artifacts and organic remains will provide valuable evidence about the activities and the lifestyle of the inhabitants of the castle. The wealth of documentary sources from the medieval period relating to the castle and the adjacent town gives a clear indication of the military and economic importance of the castle and the neighboring settlement to the English and the Welsh. The bailey is accessible to the public and the monument remains a prominent feature within the landscape.
The monument includes the earthwork and buried remains of a motte and bailey castle, on the south eastern outskirts of Ellesmere near to St Mary’s Church which dates from the 12th century. The castle is thought to have been constructed by Roger de Montgomery, the head of a marcher lordship, soon after 1086. In 1101, following a rebellion by Roger’s son and heir, Robert de Bellesme, the castle and its lands were confiscated by the Crown.

In 1138 Henry I granted the manor of Ellesmere, including the castle, to William Peverel of Dover. After the civil war Henry II confirmed the manor on Dafydd ab Owain, a north Welsh prince, when he married his sister Emma in 1174. During the early to middle part of the 13th century the manor of Ellesmere passed in and out of royal control and throughout much of that century there are numerous accounts of building or repair works to the castle. In 1263 the manor, castle and hundred of Ellesmere were granted to Hamo le Strange and continued to be held by the le Strange family until they passed by desent to the Stanleys, the Earls of Derby. It is not known when the castle was abandoned, but it is apparent from Leland’s description of the site that by the mid-16th century little if anything remained visible of the former castle buildings. By the early 18th century the top of the motte had been levelled in order to form a bowling green. The castle occupies a glacial mound that forms part of a pronounced north west – south east ridge. From this location there are extensive views of the surrounding area. The flat-topped roughly circular motte has been created by cutting into and artificially enhancing the slope of the sides of the mound and dumping the excavated material on top. It is approximately 80m in diameter at its base, 52m across the top and stands about 11m high. A steep-sided ditch, about 20m wide and 3m deep, separates the motte from the bailey to the south east. This ditch continues around the base of the motte to the north east, but has been largely infilled and is now apparent as a shallow depression. The ditch surrounding the southern part of the motte has been completely infilled, but survives as a buried feature and is included in the scheduling. The sub-rectangular bailey is situated on the eastern end of the prominence. It consists of a terrace, approximately 34m by 70m (maximum dimensions), and is bounded on its northern and eastern sides by a ditch that cuts into the steeply sloping ground and by a counterscarp bank. A causeway crosses the northern part of the eastern defences and provides access to this enclosure. The curving scarp which defines the southern side of the bailey is largely the result of later quarrying for sand and gravel. Slightly raised and leveled areas within the bailey are believed to be remains of platforms on which buildings were originally constructed. Earthworks to the north west of the motte were once thought to be the remains of a second bailey. Later work has deemed that they are the result of 19th and 20th century landscaping associated with the vicarage.

The earthworks of the castle form a readily identifiable monument. The date of construction is not known but the castle is usually ascribed to Roger of Montgomery and was probably built not long after 1086. The castle was definitely in existence by 1138.

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